Beethoven – Violin Concerto – Opus 61

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Manka Bros., Khan Manka, Emily Sachs, Emily's Music Dump, Beethoven, Josef Suk, Violin Concerto in D, Sir Adrian Boult, Sir Neville Marriner, Christopher Bishop, Robert Gooch, Michael Gray, Joseph Joachim, Felix Mendelssohn, Franz Clement, Stephen von BreuningLudwig Van Beethoven (1770-1827)

Violin Concerto in D Major, Opus 61

Josef Suk, Violin – New Philharmonia Orchestra (Sr. Adrian Boult, Conductor)

Romance No. 1 in G Major, Opus 40

Romance No. 2 in F Major, Opus 50

Academy of St. Martin-in-the-Fields (Sir Neville Marriner, Conductor)

Recorded in 1970 at Kingway Hall, London and Abbey Road Studios, London

ONE-SENTENCE REVIEW:

I’m sure Josef Suk can play this one in his sleep – and it’s just possible he did.

Manka Bros., Khan Manka, Emily Sachs, Emily's Music Dump, Beethoven, Josef Suk, Violin Concerto in D, Sir Adrian Boult, Sir Neville Marriner, Christopher Bishop, Robert Gooch, Michael Gray, Joseph Joachim, Felix Mendelssohn, Franz Clement, Stephen von BreuningORIGINAL LINER NOTES:

No liner notes on this budget disc – so how about a little Wikipedia!

Ludwig van Beethoven’s Violin Concerto in D major, Op. 61, was written in 1806.

The work was premiered on 23 December 1806 in the Theater an der Wien in Vienna.

Beethoven wrote the concerto for his colleague Franz Clement, a leading violinist of the day, who had earlier given him helpful advice on his opera Fidelio. The occasion was a benefit concert for Clement. However, the first printed edition (1808) was dedicated to Beethoven’s friend Stephan von Breuning.

It is believed that Beethoven finished the solo part so late that Clement had to sight-read part of his performance. Perhaps to express his annoyance, or to show what he could do when he had time to prepare, Clement is said to have interrupted the concerto between the first and second movements with a solo composition of his own, played on one string of the violin held upside down; however, other sources claim that he did play such a piece but only at the end of the program.

The premiere was not a success, and the concerto was little performed in the following decades.

Manka Bros., Khan Manka, Emily Sachs, Emily's Music Dump, Beethoven, Josef Suk, Violin Concerto in D, Sir Adrian Boult, Sir Neville Marriner, Christopher Bishop, Robert Gooch, Michael Gray, Joseph Joachim, Felix Mendelssohn, Franz Clement, Stephen von BreuningThe work was revived in 1844, well after Beethoven’s death, with performances by the then 12-year-old violinist Joseph Joachim with the orchestra conducted by Felix Mendelssohn.

Ever since, it has been one of the most important works of the violin concerto repertoire, and it is frequently performed and recorded today.

The Romance for Violin and Orchestra No. 1 in G major, Op. 40 is a piece for violin and orchestra, one of two such compositions, the other being Romance No. 2 in F major, Op. 50.

It was written in 1802, four years after the second romance, and was published 1803, two years before the publication of the second. Thus, this romance was designated as Beethoven’s first.

TRACK LISTING:

  • 1-3: Violin Concerto in D Major, Opus 61
  • 4: Romance No. 1 in G Major, Opus 40
  • 5: Romance No. 2 in F Major, Opus 50

And the recording being reviewed here:

FINAL THOUGHT:

Not the most dynamic recording of Beethoven’s Opus 61 but still nice to have in the closet – like an old sweater.

Manka Bros., Khan Manka Emily Sachs, Emily's Music Dump, Classical Music, Hector Berlioz, Symphonie Fantastique, Riccardo Muti, Philadelphia Orchestra, John Willan, Michael Sheady, Fussli, James Agate, Hippolyte Chelard, Richard Wagner, Mozart, Haydn, James Harding, Rossini, Felix Mendelssohn, Theophile Gautier, Victor Hugo, Delacroix, Beethoven, Hummel

Emily Sachs – President – Manka Music Group (A division of Manka Bros. Studios – The World’s Largest Media Company)

 

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Comments

  1. Niels van der Horst on May 24, 2013 at 1:20 pm said:

    Maybe you like a classically written piece for violin, cello & orchestra: http://www.nielsvanderhorst.com/page/mp3/bekijken/47 . It’s called Schreeuw (Cry) and you’ll find 3 samples of it. Enjoy!

  2. It really sound great when you read such a post which is totally helpful to you and your mostly doubts has been cleared after reading that post and your post is of that kind.

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